Bloomington DUI

Attorney John G. Prior Jr. has extensive experience trying cases both in Western and Central Illinois.
Read more about Mr. Prior's experience as an Illinois Attorney.

Criminal Offenses

Bloomington, IL

Criminal Attorney

Criminal Damage to Property

Definition of Criminal Damage To Property.  In Illinois, a person commits the offense of criminal damage to property when he: (a) knowingly damage is any property of another without his consent; or (b) recklessly by means of a fire or explosive damages property of another; or (c) knowingly starts a fire on the land of another without his consent; or (d) knowingly insures a domestic animal of another without his consent; or (e) knowingly deposits on the land or in the building of another, without his consent, any stink bomb or in any offensive smelling compound and thereby intends to interfere with the use by another of the land or building; or (f) damages any property other than as described in Section 21-1, with the intent to defraud an ensurer; or (g) knowingly shoots a firearm at a portion of a railroad train.  When the charge of criminal damage to property exceeding a specified value is brought, the extent of the damage is an element of the offense to be resolved by the trier of fact as either exceeding or not exceeding the specified value.  720 ILCS 5/21-1. (1)

Sentencing - The acts described in items (a), (b), (c), (e), and (f) are Class A misdemeanors if the damage to property does not exceed $300.  The acts described in items (a), (b), (c), (e), and (f) are Class 4 felonies if the damage to property does not exceed $300 if the damage occurs to property of a school or place of worship or to farm equipment or immovable items of agricultural production, including but not limited to grain elevators, grain bins, and barns.  The act described in item (d) is a Class 4 felony if the damage to property does not exceed $10,000.  The act described in item (g) is a Class 4 felony.  The acts described in items (a), (b), (c), (e), and (f) are Class 4 felonies if the damage to property exceeds $300 but does not exceed $10,000.  The acts described in items (a) through (f) are Class 3 felonies if the damage to property exceeds $300 but does not exceed $10,000 if the damage occurs to property of a school or place of worship or to farm equipment or immovable items of agricultural production, including but not limited to grain elevators, grain bins, and barns.  The acts described in items (a) through (f) are Class 3 felonies if the damage to property exceeds $10,000 but does not exceed $100,000.  The acts described in items (a) through (f) are Class 2 felonies if the the damage to property exceeds $10,000 but does not exceed $100,000 if the damage occurs to property of a school or place of worship or to farm equipment or immovable items of agricultural production, including but not limited to grain elevators, grain bins, and barns.  The acts described in items (a) through (f) are Class 2 felonies if the damage to property exceeds $100,000.  The acts described in items (a) through (f) are Class 1 felonies if the damage to property exceeds $100,000 and the damage occurs to property of a school or place of worship or to farm equipment or immovable items of agricultural production, including but not limited to grain elevators, grain bins, and barns.  If the damage exceeds $10,000, the court shall impose upon the offender a fine equal to the value of the damages to the property.  For the purpose of this subsection (2), “farm equipment” means machinery or other equipment used in farming.  In addition to any other sentence that maybe post, a court shall order any person convicted of criminal damage to property to perform community service for not less than 30 and not more than 120 hours, if community service is available in the jurisdiction and is funded in approved by the County Board of County were the offense was committed.  In addition, whenever any person is placed on supervision for alleged offense under this section, supervision shall be conditioned upon the performance of the community service.  This subsection does not apply when the court imposes a sentence of incarceration.  720 ILCS 5/21-1.

In all criminal matters it is recommended that you seek professional legal assistance to protect your interests. Attorney John G. Prior Jr. has experience in trying criminal damage to property cases, can give legal advice, assist you your case and ensure that your constitutional rights are protected.

If you need help with criminal damage to property case and live in Sangamon County, McLean County, or any other county in Central Illinois then contact us and schedule a free consultation.

 

Call 309-827-4300 to schedule a free consultation, or use the form below to contact us.
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Areas We Serve

Located in Bloomington, IL, The Prior Law Firm serves the criminal law needs of the following areas: